My Lai by Howard Jones audiobook

My Lai: Vietnam, 1968, and the Descent into Darkness

By Howard Jones
Read by James Patrick Cronin

Tantor Audio
17.05 Hours Unabridged
Format: CD (In Stock)
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    ISBN: 9781541406063

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On the early morning of March 16, 1968, American soldiers from three platoons of Charlie Company, entered a group of hamlets located in the Son Tinh district of South Vietnam, located near the Demilitarized Zone and known as "Pinkville" because of the high level of Vietcong infiltration. The soldiers, many still teenagers who had been in the country for three months, were on a "search and destroy" mission. Three hours after the GIs entered the hamlets, more than five hundred unarmed villagers lay dead, killed in cold blood. The atrocity took its name from one of the hamlets, known by the Americans as My Lai 4. Military authorities attempted to suppress the news of My Lai, until some who had been there, in particular a helicopter pilot named Hugh Thompson and a door gunner named Lawrence Colburn, spoke up about what they had seen. The official line was that the villagers had been killed by artillery and gunship fire rather than by small arms. That line soon began to fray. Lieutenant William Calley, one of the platoon leaders, admitted to shooting the villagers but insisted that he had acted upon orders. An expos├® of the massacre and cover-up by journalist Seymour Hersh, followed by graphic photographs, incited international outrage, and Congressional and U.S. Army inquiries began.

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Summary

Summary

One of Kirkus Reviews’ Best Books of 2017

On the early morning of March 16, 1968, American soldiers from three platoons of Charlie Company, entered a group of hamlets located in the Son Tinh district of South Vietnam, located near the Demilitarized Zone and known as "Pinkville" because of the high level of Vietcong infiltration. The soldiers, many still teenagers who had been in the country for three months, were on a "search and destroy" mission. Three hours after the GIs entered the hamlets, more than five hundred unarmed villagers lay dead, killed in cold blood. The atrocity took its name from one of the hamlets, known by the Americans as My Lai 4.

Military authorities attempted to suppress the news of My Lai, until some who had been there, in particular a helicopter pilot named Hugh Thompson and a door gunner named Lawrence Colburn, spoke up about what they had seen. The official line was that the villagers had been killed by artillery and gunship fire rather than by small arms. That line soon began to fray. Lieutenant William Calley, one of the platoon leaders, admitted to shooting the villagers but insisted that he had acted upon orders. An expos├® of the massacre and cover-up by journalist Seymour Hersh, followed by graphic photographs, incited international outrage, and Congressional and U.S. Army inquiries began.

Editorial Reviews

Editorial Reviews

"[A]n exhaustively researched and well-written narrative and analysis of the My Lai Massacre…[Jones] has produced a thorough and, as he says, ‘balanced and accurate’ analysis of the massacre itself, along with the event’s controversial and convoluted legal and political aftermath.” Vietnam Veterans of America
Jones succeeds on all counts in a book that, due to its subject matter, is not pleasant to read but is powerful and important. Kirkus Starred Review
“A powerful and discerning account of one of the darkest days in American military history. Judicious and unsparing, My Lai chronicles anew the ‘Descent into Darkness,’ and considers how we should think about the massacre today, half a century later.” Fredrik Logevall, Pulitzer Prize-winning author of Embers of War: The Fall of an Empire and the Making of America’s Vietnam
“A scrupulous history…Jones succeeds on all counts in a book that, due to its subject matter, is not pleasant to read but is powerful and important.” Kirkus Reviews (starred review)

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Reviews

Author

Author Bio: Howard Jones

Author Bio: Howard Jones

Howard Jones is University Research Professor of History Emeritus at the University of Alabama, where he taught for thirty-nine years. He is the New York Times bestselling author of Mutiny on the Amistad, as well as The Bay of Pigs, Death of a Generation, and To the Webster-Ashburton Treaty.

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Details

Details

Available Formats : CD
Category: Nonfiction/History
Runtime: 17.05
Audience: Adult
Language: English