Injustices by Ian Millhiser audiobook

Injustices: The Supreme Court's History of Comforting the Comfortable and Afflicting the Afflicted

By Ian Millhiser
Read by Joe Barrett

Tantor Audio
10.24 Hours 1
Format : CD (In Stock)
  • Regular Price: $44.99

    Special Price $29.24

    ISBN: 9798200021437

    Free shipping on orders over $35

    In Stock ● Ships in 1-2 days

  • Regular Price: $39.99

    Special Price $25.99

    ISBN: 9798200021444

    Free shipping on orders over $35

    In Stock ● Ships in 1-2 days

Few American institutions have inflicted greater suffering on ordinary people than the Supreme Court of the United States. Since its inception, the justices of the Supreme Court have shaped a nation where children toiled in coal mines, where Americans could be forced into camps because of their race, and where a woman could be sterilized against her will by state law. In this powerful indictment of a venerated institution, Ian Millhiser tells the history of the Supreme Court through the eyes of the everyday people who have suffered the most from it. America ratified three constitutional amendments to provide equal rights to freed slaves, but the justices spent thirty years largely dismantling these amendments. Then they spent the next forty years rewriting them into a shield for the wealthy and the powerful. In Injustices, Millhiser argues that the Supreme Court has seized power for itself that rightfully belongs to the people's elected representatives, and has bent the arc of American history away from justice.

Learn More

Summary

Summary

Few American institutions have inflicted greater suffering on ordinary people than the Supreme Court of the United States. Since its inception, the justices of the Supreme Court have shaped a nation where children toiled in coal mines, where Americans could be forced into camps because of their race, and where a woman could be sterilized against her will by state law. In this powerful indictment of a venerated institution, Ian Millhiser tells the history of the Supreme Court through the eyes of the everyday people who have suffered the most from it. America ratified three constitutional amendments to provide equal rights to freed slaves, but the justices spent thirty years largely dismantling these amendments. Then they spent the next forty years rewriting them into a shield for the wealthy and the powerful. In Injustices, Millhiser argues that the Supreme Court has seized power for itself that rightfully belongs to the people's elected representatives, and has bent the arc of American history away from justice.

Editorial Reviews

Editorial Reviews

An impressive debut offering explanations based on coherence between people, cases and the events they adjudicated. Kirkus
“Millhiser’s scathing, exuberant indictment of the many misdeeds of the nation’s highest court is a necessary, and highly entertaining, corrective to the mythology that has always surrounded the work of the Justices.” Jeffrey Toobin, New York Times bestselling author
Injustices is a powerful indictment of the strongest institution of the United States…A must-read for all Americans.” Washington Review of Books
“As Ian Millhiser illustrates in his trenchant, persuasive, and profoundly dispiriting book Injustices, the Supreme Court has consistently and unapologetically used its authority to thwart progress and perpetuate inequality.” Slate
“An eye-opening look at the Court. Accessible to readers with little legal background, this is a powerful study of the branch of American government most often left unchecked…[Millhiser’s] findings are startling.” Shelf Awareness
“Interesting and vigorously argued…Millhiser illuminatingly details the human costs of many decisions reached by the Supreme Court.” History Book Club
“Delivers arguments that are muscular and well-substantiated.” Publishers Weekly
“The author’s historical approach presents justices and their cases in the context of the bloody disputes the nation’s highest court was called to adjudicate…An impressive debut offering explanations based on coherence between people, cases, and the events they adjudicated.” Kirkus Reviews
“Attention Howard Zinn fans. Ian Millhiser has written a People’s History of the Supreme Court: partisan (in favor of ‘the little people’ rather than the elites the Court has favored), passionate, and provocative.” Susan N. Herman, president of the American Civil Liberties Union

Reviews

Reviews

Author

Author Bio: Ian Millhiser

Author Bio: Ian Millhiser

Ian Millhiser is a senior fellow at the Center for American Progress Action Fund and the editor of ThinkProgress Justice. He received a BA in philosophy from Kenyon College and a JD, magna cum laude, from Duke University. He clerked for Judge Eric L. Clay of the United States Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit and has worked as an attorney with the National Senior Citizens Law Center’s Federal Rights Project, as assistant director for Communications with the American Constitution Society, and as a Teach For America teacher in the Mississippi Delta. His writings have appeared in a diversity of legal and mainstream publications, including the New York Times, Los Angeles Times, US News and World Report, the Guardian, and many others.

Titles by Author

Details

Details

Available Formats : CD, MP3 CD
Category: Nonfiction/Political Science
Runtime: 10.24
Audience: Adult
Language: English