Pogrom by Steven J. Zipperstein audiobook

Pogrom: Kishinev and the Tilt of History

By Steven J. Zipperstein
Read by Barry Abrams

HighBridge, Highbridge Audio 9781631492693
6.64 Hours 1
Format : CD (In Stock)
  • Regular Price: $34.99

    Special Price $22.74

    ISBN: 9781665139489

    Free shipping on orders over $35

    In Stock ● Ships in 1-2 days

  • Regular Price: $39.99

    Special Price $25.99

    ISBN: 9781665139472

    Free shipping on orders over $35

    In Stock ● Ships in 1-2 days

So shattering were the aftereffects of Kishinev, the rampage that broke out in late-Tsarist Russia in April 1903, that one historian remarked that it was "nothing less than a prototype for the Holocaust itself." In three days of violence, 49 Jews were killed and 600 raped or wounded, while more than 1,000 Jewish-owned houses and stores were ransacked and destroyed. Recounted in lurid detail by newspapers throughout the Western world, and covered sensationally by America's Hearst press, the pre-Easter attacks seized the imagination of an international public, quickly becoming the prototype for what would become known as a "pogrom," and providing the impetus for efforts as varied as The Protocols of the Elders of Zion and the NAACP. Using new evidence culled from Russia, Israel, and Europe, distinguished historian Steven J. Zipperstein's wide-ranging book brings historical insight and clarity to a much-misunderstood event that would do so much to transform twentieth-century Jewish life and beyond.

Learn More

Summary

Summary

A New York Times Book Review Editor’s Choice of the Week

So shattering were the aftereffects of Kishinev, the rampage that broke out in late-Tsarist Russia in April 1903, that one historian remarked that it was "nothing less than a prototype for the Holocaust itself." In three days of violence, 49 Jews were killed and 600 raped or wounded, while more than 1,000 Jewish-owned houses and stores were ransacked and destroyed. Recounted in lurid detail by newspapers throughout the Western world, and covered sensationally by America's Hearst press, the pre-Easter attacks seized the imagination of an international public, quickly becoming the prototype for what would become known as a "pogrom," and providing the impetus for efforts as varied as The Protocols of the Elders of Zion and the NAACP. Using new evidence culled from Russia, Israel, and Europe, distinguished historian Steven J. Zipperstein's wide-ranging book brings historical insight and clarity to a much-misunderstood event that would do so much to transform twentieth-century Jewish life and beyond.

Editorial Reviews

Editorial Reviews

“Impressive, heart wrenching…Zipperstein reminds us that it is important to understand the catastrophes that preceded. And there’s no better place to start than Kishinev…[A] masterly work.” New York Times Book Review
"[A] historical masterpiece.” Los Angeles Review of Books
“With extraordinary scholarly energy, Zipperstein uncovers sources in Russian, Yiddish, and English that show not only why this bloody event ignited the Jewish imagination, its sense of embattlement in exile, but also why it had such lasting resonance internationally.” New Yorker
“Zipperstein’s excellent narrative vividly illustrates…why the lessons that ‘spilled from the pogrom’s rubble’ still resonate today.” San Francisco Chronicle
“A riveting, often painful and vivid picture of a pogrom which captured attention worldwide, Zipperstein looks beyond the event itself…Written with the insight of an impeccable historian, his account―that will intrigue scholars as well as the widest array of readers―can be seen as a harbinger of what would come but four decades later.” Deborah Lipstadt, author of The Eichmann Trial
Pogrom is a splendid book that pinpoints the moment at the start of the twentieth century when exile in Europe turned deadly in a way that foretold the end of everything. It tells us the horror that occurred street by street, butchery by butchery―with gripping clarity and an admirable brevity.” Philip Roth, author of The Human Stain
“This book, a model of the historian’s craft, demonstrates how a single event in a provincial town can shape the imagination of a century. Structural grace and clear prose allow a lifetime of historical meditation and a decade of multilingual research to reach virtually any reader interested in Jewish, Russian, and, indeed, American history.” Timothy Snyder, author of Black Earth

Reviews

Reviews

Author

Author Bio: Steven J. Zipperstein

Author Bio: Steven J. Zipperstein

Steven J. Zipperstein is the Daniel E. Koshland Professor in Jewish Culture and History at Stanford University. He is a contributor to the New York Times, the Washington Post, and the Jewish Review of Books and coeditor of the “Jewish Lives” series for Yale University Press.

Titles by Author

Details

Details

Available Formats : CD, MP3 CD
Category: Nonfiction/History
Runtime: 6.64
Audience: Adult
Language: English