The Decline and Fall of IBM by Robert X. Cringely audiobook

The Decline and Fall of IBM: End of an American Icon?

By Robert X. Cringely
Read by  Robert X. Cringely

Made for Success 9780990444428
3.74 Hours 1
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IBM is in serious trouble. Big Blue, as the company is known, tends to rely on magical thinking for its success, but that magic ran out long ago. The trouble began back in the 1990s, and IBM had to hire, for the first time, an outside CEO. Lou Gerstner saved the day, pushing IBM into services with spectacular results, but not without consequence. As services became commoditized, IBM could compete only by offshoring the work. Quality suffered. In addition, Gerstner’s compensation was very high, which impacted IBM negatively. In IBM’s history only the Watson family struck it rich while running the company. Later CEOs, such as John Opel and John Akers, lived comfortable lives with many perks, but they weren’t “big rich.”—that changed with Gerstner. IBM has essentially sacrificed both its customers and its employees in the name of earnings. The company has cut labor to the bone, outsourced as much as possible, and its products have dropped in quality. Acquisitions are deliberately underbid. These moves, combined with share buybacks, have kept earnings growing until recently, when the house of cards began to fall. IBM’s current CEO, Ginni Rometty, has outlined an earnings goal for 2015, and she is not afraid to destroy the company to achieve it. This book outlines IBM’s fall from grace, where the company is heading, and what can be done to save it before it’s too late.

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Summary

Summary

IBM is in serious trouble. Big Blue, as the company is known, tends to rely on magical thinking for its success, but that magic ran out long ago.

The trouble began back in the 1990s, and IBM had to hire, for the first time, an outside CEO. Lou Gerstner saved the day, pushing IBM into services with spectacular results, but not without consequence. As services became commoditized, IBM could compete only by offshoring the work. Quality suffered. In addition, Gerstner’s compensation was very high, which impacted IBM negatively. In IBM’s history only the Watson family struck it rich while running the company. Later CEOs, such as John Opel and John Akers, lived comfortable lives with many perks, but they weren’t “big rich.”—that changed with Gerstner.

IBM has essentially sacrificed both its customers and its employees in the name of earnings. The company has cut labor to the bone, outsourced as much as possible, and its products have dropped in quality. Acquisitions are deliberately underbid. These moves, combined with share buybacks, have kept earnings growing until recently, when the house of cards began to fall. IBM’s current CEO, Ginni Rometty, has outlined an earnings goal for 2015, and she is not afraid to destroy the company to achieve it.

This book outlines IBM’s fall from grace, where the company is heading, and what can be done to save it before it’s too late.

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Author

Author Bio: Robert X. Cringely

Author Bio: Robert X. Cringely

Robert X. Cringely has been a Silicon Valley journalist and character for more than thirty years. An early employee of iconic companies including Apple and Adobe Systems, Cringely began his career as an engineer then transitioned into reporting and analysis. His work has appeared in magazines and newspapers throughout the world including Forbes, the New York Times, Newsweek, and many others. His previous book, Accidental Empires, was published in eighteen languages. Cringely lives in Santa Rosa, California, with his family.

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Details

Details

Available Formats : CD, MP3 CD
Category: Nonfiction/Business & Economics
Runtime: 3.74
Audience: Adult
Language: English