The Jamestown Brides by Jennifer Potter audiobook

The Jamestown Brides

By Jennifer Potter
Read by Charlotte Strevens

Blackstone Publishing 9780190942632
10.04 Hours Unabridged
Format: CD (In Stock)
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Jamestown, England’s first real foothold in the New World, was fraught with danger—from starvation and disease to violent skirmishes between colonists and the native populations. Mortality rates were impossibly high: six out of seven settlers died within the first few years. How clear these and other perils were made to the fifty-six young women who left their homes and boarded ships in England in 1621, nearly fifteen years after Jamestown’s founding, is not known. But we do know who they were. Their ages ranged from sixteen to twenty-eight, and they were deemed “young and uncorrupt.” Each had a bride price of 150 pounds of tobacco set by the Virginia Company, which funded their voyage. Though the women had all gone of their own free will, they were to be sold into marriage, generating a profit for investors and helping ensure the colony’s long-term viability. Without letters or journals (young women from middling classes had not generally been taught to write), Jennifer Potter turned to the Virginia Company’s merchant lists—which were used as a kind of sales catalog for prospective husbands—as well as censuses, court records, the minutes of Virginia’s General Assemblies, letters to England from their male counterparts, and other such accounts of the everyday life of the early colonists. In The Jamestown Brides, she spins a fascinating tale of courage and survival, exploring the women’s lives in England before their departure and their experiences in Jamestown. Some were married before the ships left harbor. Some were killed in an attack by the native population only months after their arrival. A few never married at all. In telling the story of these “Maids for Virginia,” Potter sheds light on life for women in early modern England and in the New World.

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Summary

Summary

Jamestown, England’s first real foothold in the New World, was fraught with danger—from starvation and disease to violent skirmishes between colonists and the native populations. Mortality rates were impossibly high: six out of seven settlers died within the first few years. How clear these and other perils were made to the fifty-six young women who left their homes and boarded ships in England in 1621, nearly fifteen years after Jamestown’s founding, is not known. But we do know who they were. Their ages ranged from sixteen to twenty-eight, and they were deemed “young and uncorrupt.” Each had a bride price of 150 pounds of tobacco set by the Virginia Company, which funded their voyage. Though the women had all gone of their own free will, they were to be sold into marriage, generating a profit for investors and helping ensure the colony’s long-term viability.

Without letters or journals (young women from middling classes had not generally been taught to write), Jennifer Potter turned to the Virginia Company’s merchant lists—which were used as a kind of sales catalog for prospective husbands—as well as censuses, court records, the minutes of Virginia’s General Assemblies, letters to England from their male counterparts, and other such accounts of the everyday life of the early colonists. In The Jamestown Brides, she spins a fascinating tale of courage and survival, exploring the women’s lives in England before their departure and their experiences in Jamestown. Some were married before the ships left harbor. Some were killed in an attack by the native population only months after their arrival. A few never married at all. In telling the story of these “Maids for Virginia,” Potter sheds light on life for women in early modern England and in the New World.

Editorial Reviews

Editorial Reviews

“With extraordinary scholarship and painstaking use of contemporary texts, Potter succeeds in her professed task of bearing witness to the lives of young women unknown to history…Full of sensational material.” Times Literary Supplement (London)
“Compelling…A pleasure to read.” BBC History Magazine
“I love this kind of historical writing, with the stitching showing. There is a story here, but it is Potter’s skillful guidance through the disparate sources that makes it work. Engaged and thoughtful, she has given her women an existence they would recognize.” Literary Review
“With her warm voice and inquisitive tone, narrator Charlotte Strevens brings listeners back to the difficult early days of the American Colonies…Strevens employs shifts in tone and pitch to evoke the relentless dangers of both the ship’s crossing and life in the colonies. Her decision to subtly emphasize the occasional direct quote keeps the story flowing, and her conversational pacing engages listeners throughout.” AudioFile
“An evocative and painstakingly researched account of these early female settlers, who have lacked a voice, an identity, even a name, until now. From 400 years ago, they step from these pages and speak to us.” The Tablet, a book of the year selection

Reviews

Reviews

Author

Author Bio: Jennifer Potter

Author Bio: Jennifer Potter

Jennifer Potter is author of four novels and five works of nonfiction, including Strange Blooms, The Rose: A True History, and Seven Flowers. As Royal Literary Fund Consultant Fellow, she inspires good writing among doctoral students and younger academics, and she was recently appointed one of the first Royal Literary Fund Fellows at the British Library.

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Details

Details

Available Formats : CD, MP3 CD
Category: Nonfiction/History
Runtime: 10.04
Audience: Adult
Language: English