They Can't Kill Us All by Wesley Lowery audiobook

They Can't Kill Us All: Ferguson, Baltimore, and a New Era in America's Racial Justice Movement

By Wesley Lowery
Read by Ron Butler

Little, Brown & Company 9780316312479
8.17 Hours 1
Format : CD (In Stock)
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    ISBN: 9781478943211

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A deeply reported book that brings alive the quest for justice in the deaths of Michael Brown, Tamir Rice, and Freddie Gray, offering both unparalleled insight into the reality of police violence in America and an intimate, moving portrait of those working to end it Conducting hundreds of interviews during the course of over one year reporting on the ground, Washington Post writer Wesley Lowery traveled from Ferguson, Missouri, to Cleveland, Ohio; Charleston, South Carolina; and Baltimore, Maryland; and then back to Ferguson to uncover life inside the most heavily policed, if otherwise neglected, corners of America today. In an effort to grasp the magnitude of the repose to Michael Brown’s death and understand the scale of the problem police violence represents, Lowery speaks to Brown’s family and the families of other victims other victims’ families as well as local activists. By posing the question, “What does the loss of any one life mean to the rest of the nation?” Lowery examines the cumulative effect of decades of racially biased policing in segregated neighborhoods with failing schools, crumbling infrastructure and too few jobs. Studded with moments of joy, and tragedy, They Can’t Kill Us All offers a historically informed look at the standoff between the police and those they are sworn to protect, showing that civil unrest is just one tool of resistance in the broader struggle for justice. As Lowery brings vividly to life, the protests against police killings are also about the black community’s long history on the receiving end of perceived and actual acts of injustice and discrimination. They Can’t Kill Us All grapples with a persistent if also largely unexamined aspect of the otherwise transformative presidency of Barack Obama: the failure to deliver tangible security and opportunity to those Americans most in need of both.

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Summary

Summary

Winner of the Christopher Isherwood Prize for Reportage

A New York Times Top 10 Book of 2016

An Oprah Magazine Pick of Best Books on the Modern Protest Movement

A USA Today Pick of Books about Racism

A Millions.com Pick of Best Anti-Racist Reading

An Esquire Magazine Pick of Books to Learn about Racism

A Bustle Pick of Books about Race Every White Person Should Read

A BookRiot Pick of Must-Read Books about Racism

A Publishers Weekly Pick for Anti-Racist Reading List

A Signature Best Book on Contemporary Activism in America

A deeply reported book that brings alive the quest for justice in the deaths of Michael Brown, Tamir Rice, and Freddie Gray, offering both unparalleled insight into the reality of police violence in America and an intimate, moving portrait of those working to end it

Conducting hundreds of interviews during the course of over one year reporting on the ground, Washington Post writer Wesley Lowery traveled from Ferguson, Missouri, to Cleveland, Ohio; Charleston, South Carolina; and Baltimore, Maryland; and then back to Ferguson to uncover life inside the most heavily policed, if otherwise neglected, corners of America today.

In an effort to grasp the magnitude of the repose to Michael Brown’s death and understand the scale of the problem police violence represents, Lowery speaks to Brown’s family and the families of other victims other victims’ families as well as local activists. By posing the question, “What does the loss of any one life mean to the rest of the nation?” Lowery examines the cumulative effect of decades of racially biased policing in segregated neighborhoods with failing schools, crumbling infrastructure and too few jobs.

Studded with moments of joy, and tragedy, They Can’t Kill Us All offers a historically informed look at the standoff between the police and those they are sworn to protect, showing that civil unrest is just one tool of resistance in the broader struggle for justice. As Lowery brings vividly to life, the protests against police killings are also about the black community’s long history on the receiving end of perceived and actual acts of injustice and discrimination.

They Can’t Kill Us All grapples with a persistent if also largely unexamined aspect of the otherwise transformative presidency of Barack Obama: the failure to deliver tangible security and opportunity to those Americans most in need of both.

Editorial Reviews

Editorial Reviews

An explosive examination of police brutality O, The Oprah Magazine
“Lowery’s book is electric, because it is so well reported, so plainly told and so evidently the work of a man who has not grown a callus on his heart.” New York Times
“Riveting…The personal challenges faced by the young black journalist are thought-provoking and compelling.” Boston Globe
“Lowery is unflinchingly honest…a skillful reporter and storyteller…He succinctly presents a story of human grief.” New York Times Book Review
"[A] vital book.” Elle
“The quiet optimism underlying his book is itself an act of protest in our dark times.” The Nation
“A wise memoir that chronicles the fatigue of reporting Black death at the hands of law enforcement.” Ebony
“A first-person account of those events from the author’s dual—and conflicted—perspective as a journalist and an African-American man.” Esquire
“Insightful and unnerving.” Minneapolis Star Tribune
Through hundreds of interviews, [Lowery] looks at how the deaths of Michael Brown, Freddie Gray, and Tamir Rice have affected communities, plus the impact of perceived and actual discrimination. Lowery also offers insight into the movement that has sprung up in response and what is left to be done. Bustle
Lowery takes us inside the pain and courage of those who have cared to challenge the police and this nation. He details their stories and, along the way, provides a powerful and all-too-human account of what it means to be a reporter in a time of profound crisis. His example gives me renewed home in those who report the news. This is a must read! Eddie S. Glaude, Jr., author of Democracy in Black: How Race Still Enslaves the American Soul
[Lowery's portrait of a nation facing up to issues of race and justice is gripping, as are his accounts of the passion and pain of activists like Brittany Packnett, who told President Obama, 'Our lives matter, stop killing us.' BBC
A narrative of outrage, struggle, and, eventually, optimism.... A balanced look at a protest movement that's only just begun to gather focus and strength. Vulture
With so much political media coverage to distract us, Lowery sets out to remind us why revisiting our history is crucial for racial improvement. New York Magazine
What makes They Can't Kill Us All more than a ripped-from-the-headlines chronicle is Lowery's combination of solid reporting, emotional commitment to his story as a black man and a reflective turn of mind. Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

Reviews

Reviews

Author

Author Bio: Wesley Lowery

Author Bio: Wesley Lowery

Wesley Lowery is a national reporter for the Washington Post who covers law enforcement and justice. He was the paper’s lead reporter in Ferguson, Missouri, and covering the Black Lives Matter protest movement and was a member of the team awarded the 2016 Pulitzer Prize for National Reporting for the paper’s coverage of police shootings. His reporting has previously appeared in the Boston Globe, Los Angeles Times, and the Wall Street Journal.

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Details

Details

Available Formats : CD
Category: Nonfiction/Political Science
Runtime: 8.17
Audience: Adult
Language: English